Work Surfaces

Shop Made Band Saw

It is a truism that no workshop is ever large enough it is equally true that no woodworker ever has enough tables, benches, sawhorses, stands, or props to support work in progress. The traditional workbench, however useful or necessary (seepage 46), is only the beginning. For many uses, it is too high, too small, or too immobile to be helpful. When it is time to mark the elements of a joint or assemble the many pieces of a chair, a solid work table, like the library-style table shown on page...

Tool Cupboard

The cupboard above features twin doors for storing small, light tools like chisels and screwdrivers, as well as a large main compartment for bigger tools. Cut the components from inch plywood or lumber to the appropriate size, depending on the number of tools you own the cupboard shown above is 48 inches square and 5 inches deep with 3-inch-deep doors. Next, assemble the cupboard using the joinery method of your choice. A through dovetail joint is one of the strongest and most visually pleasing...

A magnetic tool rack

Keep metal tools organized and accessible on a commercial magnetic tool rack. The model shown features a heavy-duty bar magnet that will hold any Iron-based tool securely from screwdrivers, chisels, and hammers to try squares and scissors. To mount the rack, screw the magnet to a wood strip and anchor the strip to wall studs above your workbench. Clamps can be a nuisance to store. The sheer number accumulated in most shops and their awkward size and shape can stretch even the most organized...

Scrapbox

Use a scrapbox to keep from cluttering the shop floor with cut-offs, shavings, and other refuse. The design shown at left can be built quickly from -inch plywood casters allow the unit to be rolled where it is needed and moved out of the way when it is not. Saw the sides and bottom to a size appropriate to your needs, then cut four corner blocks from 2-by-2 stock. Screw the four sides together, driving the screws into the comer blocks. Turn the box over and nail the bottom to the corner blocks...

Shelf For Clamps

Built from V -inch plywood, the shelf shown at right features a series of notches for supporting bar and pipe clamps along a shop wall. Cut the shelf about 10 inches wide and as long as you need for the number of clamps you wish to store. Cut the notches at 3-inch intervals with a saber saw and make them wide enough for the clamp bars or pipes IVa inches is about right for most clamps. Then screw shelf brackets to the underside of the shelf, centering them between the notches. Fasten the shelf...

Tool Cabinet

Power Tools For Cabinet Making

The tool cabinet shown above is handy for storing and organizing hand tools. Although the entire unit is portable, the drawers are removable, making it possible to carry around only the tools that are needed. Build the cabinet from either -inch plywood or solid lumber. The size of the box will depend on your needs but 40 inches high by 30 inches wide by 15 inches deep is a good starting point. Position the divider in the center of the cabinet so that the spaces on both sides of it are equal,...

Adapting drawers to hold small items

The addition of some simple trays can make drawers much more efficient storage units, especially for small items like screws and washers, which can be easily lost. The jar organizer shown above keeps different-sized jars in order. The shelf raises the smaller jars to make them more accessible. Begin by collecting the jars Find some larger ones nearly the same height as the drawer and some smaller ones about half that height. Make the divider by trimming a piece of Vinnch plywood to fit inside...

Assembling a frameandfoot sawhorse

Lightweight, compact frame-and-foot sawhorses like the one shown at left can be built from 2-by-4 stock. Start by cutting the legs to a suitable height, then prepare them to join to the other parts of the unit Cut tenons at the bottom ends, rout through mortises halfway up the faces, and saw 1-inch-deep notches in the middle of the top ends. Cut the feet to length and, for added stability, cut recesses along their bottom edges, leaving a 2-inch pad at each end. Rout mortises through the middle...

Assembling The Benchtop

Building Tail Vise

Before gluing up the benchtop, rout grooves on both sides of the dog blocks and front rail, on one face of the front apron and back rail, and along the edges and ends of the top slab. Cut matching keys and splines. Refer to the drawing on page 53 for the size and placement of the grooves, keys, and splines. If you want to incorporate a tool tray in your bench, cut Vfe-inch rabbets into the bottom edges of the back rail and apron later in the assembly process you...

Build It Yourself continued

To mount the insert in the table, set it in place on the cleats and bore a hole through the insert and the cleats at each corner the holes should be countersunk. Screw the insert to the cleats. For the electric drill insert, bore a hole through the center of the insert that is slightly wider than the largest accessory you plan to use. Then screw a commercial drill guide to the underside of the insert so the drill chuck will be centered in the hole. (You may need...

Building a low assembly table

For operations that are awkward to perform on a standard-height table, use an assembly table like the one shown at left. Ideal for jobs like gluing up carcases, the table can be built easily in the shop with a small amount of wood. Refer to the dimensions in the illustration for a work surface that is about 12 inches lower than a standard table. Saw the legs from 4-by-4 stock and the rails and braces from 2-by-4s cut miters at the ends of the braces so they butt against the legs and sit flush...

Building an adjustable pipe rack

The rack shown above, made of 4-by-4 stock and steel pipe, is attached to wall studs. The steel pipes should be roughly 24 inches long and 3A inch in diameter. They can be inserted into any of the holes drilled into the vertical supports or cross-pieces, allowing lumber to be piled on the pipes or stacked on end between them. Begin by cutting the uprights to length and mark each point on them where you want to locate a cross-piece. Cut dadoes in the sides of the uprights to accommodate the...

Building an adjustable roller stand

To build the roller stand shown at right, start by constructing the frame for the roller, cutting the four pieces from l-by-4 stock. Glue the frame together with butt joints, adding screws to reinforce the connections. Then bore a hole in the middle of each side of the frame for a Vi-inch-diameter carriage bolt. Locate the hole 3 inches from the bottom of the frame. Insert the bolts from the inside of the frame and screw the roller to the top. As well as the commercial roller shown, two...

Choosing a generator with a suitable wattage rating

All electric tools require more power to start up than for continuous running. The chart at left gives typical power requirements for a number of tools. When selecting a generator, make sure its wattage rating is higher than the start-up wattage of your most powerful tool. Add a safety margin of about 20 percent to the combined running wattage of all tools you will plug into the device and operate at the same time. Read your owner's manual carefully before operating a generator. Never run a...

Connecting a collection hood to a router table

A hood attached to the fence of a router table will collect most of the dust produced by the tool. Cut the hood from SHOP TIP Vfe-lnch plywood, sizing It so the sides hug the outside edges of the fence's support brackets. The bottom edge of the back flange should rest on the table the top flange should sit on the top edge of the fence. Before assembling the pieces of the hood, cut a hole through the back for the collection hose. Also bore holes for screws through the sides and screw angle irons...

Controlling Bleeding

Applying direct pressure to stop bleeding To help stop profuse or rapid bleeding, apply direct pressure to the wound with a gauze dressing or a clean cloth and, if possible, elevate the injury (above, left). Direct pressure should stop the flow of blood and allow it to clot. If the dressing becomes blood-soaked, add another over the first one avoid lifting the dressing to inspect the wound. It will be easier to maintain steady pressure if you wrap the wound with a roller bandage (above, right)...

Electrical Layout For A Mediumsize Shop

Incandescent lighting fixture Fluorescent lighting fixture Direction of feed The illustration at left shows one electrical layout for a medium-size shop. The shop has six separate electrical circuits four for tools and two for lighting. The basic principle to keep in mind is that no circuit using 12-gauge wire should carry more than 80 percent of its capacity for 20-amp circuits, this means the combined amperage of the tools on the same circuit plus 25 percent of the rating of the largest...

Electrical Power

Amp Sub Panel

Electric power requirement should be considered early in the process of planning a shop's layout. Allow for growth. Then, as you add new tools and light fixtures, you will avoid the headaches of an inadequate system repeated tripping of circuit breakers or blowing of fuses, and octopus adapters tunneling several power cords into one outlet. If you plan to wire your shop to your home's main service panel, be sure that your electrical supply has enough additional power. You can get a rough idea...

Fire Safety

Considering the number of flammable materials and potential ignition sources in awoodworking shop, fire prevention shouldbe one ofyour foremost safety concerns. Sawdust, wood, paint, and thinners tend to accumulate often they are near tools that produce sparks and heat. The combination can prove volatile When vaporized in a small enough concentration of air, a small quantity of lacquer thinner, for example, can be ignited by a spark from a tool and cause a life-threatening explosion. Thefirst...

Generator Safety Tips

Keep gas and oil only in containers designed specifically for fuel storage and clearly marked FUEL. Keep the containers away from sources of heat and flames. Check the engine oil level each time you refuel the generator. Check the generator's fuel lines and connections regularly if you notice any leakage, turn the machine off and have it serviced before resuming operations. Never use a generator with a faulty or damaged exhaust system. Ground the generator following the manufacturer's...

Handling A Shock Victim

Some degree of shock either immediate or delayed accompanies any injury. Shock can be provoked by loss of blood, pain, or an allergic reaction. Signs of shock include anxiety or confusion cold or clammy skin weak, irregular breathing or pulse and loss of consciousness. If you suspect an injury victim is suffering from shock, immediately call for emergency help. If the victim is conscious, place him on his back with his feet propped up 8 to 12 inches above the level of his head (right). Loosen...

Installing portable cabinets

The box at right can be hung securely on a shop wall and easily moved If necessary. Build it from -inch plywood with a hinged top. To hang the cabinet on the wall, cut a 45 angle bevel down the middle of a l-by-6, then crosscut the two pieces slightly less than the width of the box. Screw one of the pieces to the wall as a batten, with the bevel pointing up and facing the wall anchor as many of the fasteners as possible in wall studs. Screw the other piece to the back of the box with its flat...

Making and installing a folddown work table

The table shown above incorporates a large and sturdy work surface, but still conserves space by folding up against a wall when it is not in use. The dimensions in the illustration yield a work surface measuring 20 by 48 inches. Cut the bracing, legs, rails, and stretchers from 2-by-4 stock and screw the bracing between the wall studs (inset)-, there should be one brace for every pair of studs along the table's length. Fasten the front legs to the side rails using carriage bolts and lock nuts...

Making and installing the racks

Shop walls make ideal storage areas for bar and pipe clamps. For bar clamps (above, left), nail two cleats across the wall studs. Position the upper cleat made of plywood high enough to keep the clamps off the floor make the lower one from two 2-by-4s nailed together so that the clamps will tilt toward the wall. For pipe clamps (above, right), nail cleats of 3 4-lnch plywood to the studs and screw broom grippers to the cleats. Position the cleats on the wall so the clamps will rest about 1 inch...

Making and setting up carving dogs

Using a standard bench dog as a model, you can fashion a pair of customized dogs that will grip a carved or turned work-piece, or secure irregular-sized work, such as mitered molding. To make these accessories, cut bevels on either side of the head of a standard bench dog and drive a small screw or nail into the center of the head snip off the fastener's head to form a sharp point. To use the devices, place one dog in a dog hole of the bench's fixed dog block and the other in the tail vise or a...

Making and using a temporary bench stop

A clamped-on bench stop cut from inch plywood will secure a workpiece to the benchtop without the help of bench dogs. Cut the bench stop to size, then mark out a triangular wedge, typically 3 inches shorter than the stop. Cut out the wedge and set it aside. To use the bench stop, clamp it to the benchtop and slide the workpiece into the notch, butting one side against the straight edge of the notch Secure the piece with the wedge, tapping it tightly in place with a mallet (left).

Minimum Wire Gauge For Extension Cords

-MINIMUM GAUGEFOR DIFFERENT LENGTH CORDS Choosing a wire with the proper gauge Using an extension cord with the wrong gauge can cause a drop in line voltage, resulting in loss of power, excessive heat, and tool burnout. Refer to the chart at left to determine the minimum wire gauge for the tool and task at hand. If, for instance, your tool has a 7-amp motor and you are using a 75-foot extension cord, the minimum gauge should be 14. Choose only round-jacketed extension cords listed by...

Noise Levels Produced By Power Tools

Sound Levels Power Tools

While a -horsepowerdrill press is unlikely to damage your hearing unless you run the machine all day long-unprotected exposure to the noise produced by a 1 -horsepowerrouter can be dangerous after only 30 minutes. The above chart shows approximate noise levels produced by a variety of power tools. Keep in mind that tools with dull cutters or blades generate more noise than those with well-sharpened cutting edges

Outfitting a table saw with a folddown outfeed table

A handy extension to your saw table for cutting long stock, the shop-made jig shown above swings down out of the way when it is not needed. Start by cutting the top, sides, and support brackets from X-inch plywood, sizing the pieces to suit your needs. Then saw the braces and cleat from l-by-2 stock, adding an angled notch at the bottom end of both braces. Screw the sides to the top, countersinking the fasteners. Next, get ready to attach the jig to the saw housing. First, attach an angle iron...

Preparing The Fixed Dog Block

Bench dogs are fabricated from two boards, so it is simple to cut the dog holes in the thicker piece before glue-up. Two steps are involved. First, cut a row of evenly spaced dadoes wide enough to accept the dogs angle the fixed-block dadoes slightly toward the tail vise, and the slid-ing-block dadoes away from the tail vise so that the dogs will grip the work firmly when clamping pressure is applied. Next, clamp the board to a work surface and use a chisel to notch the top of each dado to...

Setting up a temporary stand

With only a sawhorse, two C clamps, and a commercial roller, you can make a simple roller stand like the one shown at left. Make a T-shaped mast for the roller that is long enough to hold it at a suitable height. Screw the roller to the horizontal part of the mast. Add a brace to the side of the horse for clamping the mast in place Cut a l-by-4 to span the legs between the sawhorse bracket and the original brace and screw it to the legs. Cut a l-by-2 to span the two braces and screw it in place...

Setting up positivepressure ventilation

To maintain clear air in a shop when you are generating a great deal of airborne dust or chemical fumes, set up a positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) system. Open all the windows in the shop and position a fan outside the door as shown at right so that the airflow it produces will envelop the doorway. The stream of air will follow the path of least resistance through the door and shop, and out the windows, clearing airborne dust and fumes quickly. PPV has some limitations, however. The system...

Shop

A pair of hanger bolts can enable you to secure an irregular-shaped workpiece, such as a carving block, to your bench. The bolts feature wood screw threads on one end and machine screw threads on the other. To secure a work-piece, bore two holes through the bench-top for the bolts. Screw the bolts into the carving block from underneath the top and hold the bolts to the underside of the top with washers and wing nuts.

Shop Tip

A trash can fitted with a shopmade lid serves as a convenient way to store small bar or pipe clamps. Cut a piece of 1 2-inch plywood into a circle slightly smaller than the diameter of the can's rim. Then scribe a series of concentric circles on the plywood to help you locate the holes for the c amp bars. Space the circles about 3 inches apart and mark points every 3 Inches along them. Bore a 1-inch-diame-ter hole through each point, fit the piece of plywood in the can and drop the clamps...

Storing hand tools

The tool tray shown above keeps different tools apart and similar ones together, helping to protect them while making a needed item easy to locate. The tray has the additional advantage of being suspended from overhead joists so that it takes up no valuable work space. Start by bolting two 2-by-4s to joists, spacing them to accommodate the tray. Cut off the bottom ends of the 2-by-4s at a convenient height. Next, build the tray, cutting the sides from VWnch stock, and the bottom and the...

Storing Wood

Properly stored lumber and plywood are not only kept out of the way but straight and dry, too. For most shops, this involves storing lumber in racks that hold the wood off the floor. Wood shrinks and expands according to the amount of humidity to which it is exposed. A wet floor can warp lumber and delaminate some plywoods. The lumber racks featured in this section are easy and inexpensive to build you should be able to find a suitable design and adapt it to your needs. If you have the space,...

Supporting a folddown work surface on sawhorses

Rather than building a framework for a fold-down work surface, you can use a panel of 3 4-inch plywood hinged to the wall and supported by sawhorses. The surface can be of any size. Begin by setting the panel on two sawhorses one edge of the panel should be flush against the wall. Mark a point on the panel at every wall stud, then install butt hinges, screwing one leaf of each hinge to a stud and the other leaf to the panel at a pencil mark. To secure the panel when it is folded up, screw a...

Testing A Respirator

A respirator is only as good as its seal against your face. No seal, no protection. To test your respirator, place it over your face, setting the top strap over the crown of your head. Adjust the side straps for a snugfit. To test the respirator, cover the outlet valve with your hand and breathe out gently (right). There should be no air leakage around the facepiece. If air leaks out of the respirator, readjust the straps for a tighter fit. Replace the facepiece when necessary following the...

Treating A Victim Of Electrical Shock

A person who contacts a live current may experience only a mild tingling sensation. Sometimes, however, the victim's muscles contract involuntarily around the source. Do not touch the victim or the electrical source. Instead, immediately stop the flow of electricity in the circuit at a wall switch or the service panel. If the electricity cannot be shut off immediately, use a dry wood implement, such as a broom handle, to knock the victim free of the electrical source (right). Call for medical...

Truing the wheel

To true a grinder wheel and square its edges, use a star-wheel dresser or a diamond-point dresser. For the star-wheel dresser, move the grinder's tool rest away from the wheel. With the guard in position, switch on the grinder and butt the tip of the dresser against the wheel. Then, with your index finger resting against the tool rest, move the dresser side-to-side across the wheel (right). For the diamondpoint dresser, hold the device between the index finger and thumb of one hand, set it on...

Using a Lazy Susantype storage cupboard

If your workshop has an unused corner an area under a counter, for example, install a commercial Lazy Susantype cupboard to store workshop tools and supplies. The design of the device makes any item on the trays easily accessible. The model shown above features a carousel with two trays that revolve around a metal shaft. Using 3 4-inch plywood, build a cabinet like the one shown above to house the carousel and support the metal shaft at both the top and bottom. Assemble the carousel following...

Mnopqrs

Mortise A rectangular, round, or oval-shaped hole cut into a piece of wood. Mortise-and-tenon A joint in which a projecting tenon on one board fits into a mortise on another. Push block or stick A device used to feed a workpiece into the blade, cutterhead, or bit of a tool to protect the operator's fingers. Rabbet A step-like cut in the edge or end of a workpiece usually forms part of a joint. Rail A board running along the bottom edge of a tabletop to which the legs of a table can be attached....

The Value Of A Workbench

A workshop can be anywhere you can fit a solid surface. A retired carver friend built a superb workshop in the linen closet of his apartment. He only had to open the closet door, pull out a stool, and go to work. Everything he needed was fitted into a space of less than 10 square feet. I built the small cherry bench in the photograph to fit an awkward alcove in my office that measures only 23 by 37 inches. For years I had been using my desk as a makeshift workbench and I was frustrated by both...

Sawhorse panel support frame

When sawing large panels, proper support Is needed to keep the work from buckling and binding on the blade as the cut is made, and to stop the cutoff from falling away as the cut is finished. To accommodate these cumbersome jobs, construct this 4-by-8-foot support frame, which is easily held in place with notched wood blocks. Cut two 4-foot and two 8-foot lengths of 2-by-4 for the ends and sides of the frame. Cut dadoes six inches from the ends of the 4-foot lengths and 18 inches from the ends...

Making a heavyduty sawhorse

Reinforced by a stretcher, braces, and simple joinery, the sawhorse shown above will endure for years as a sturdy work surface. Saw the crosspiece to length from a 2-by-6 and cut dadoes in the edges about 4 inches from either end to accommodate the legs. Angle the dadoes roughly 10 from the vertical. Next, saw the 2-by-4 legs to length and cut 1 Winch-deep angled notches into their outside edges to house the braces. The top of each brace should rest about IV2 inches below the tops of the legs....

Work Tables

Zip System Panel

Almost as strong as a traditional workbench, this commercial work table is a versatile workhorse, especially when paired with a woodworker's vise. The cabinet and drawers provide storage space, and can be locked to secure valuable tools. For many light woodworking chores, from marking out joints to assembling pieces of furniture, a simple work table fits the bill as well as a traditional woodworker's bench. This section features several table designs. All are quick, easy, and inexpensive to...

Making a bench hook

The shop-built jig shown at right will ensure that the crosscuts you make on the workbench will be square. Use -inch plywood for the base and strips of 2-by-2 stock for the lips. Make the base at least as long as the width of your workpiece and wide enough to support it. Screw the lips to the guide, attaching one to each face. To use the jig, butt one lip against the edge of the bench and press the work-piece firmly against the other. Align the cutting line with the edge of the base and make...

Building an extension table for a radial arm saw

Made entirely from 2-by-4 and l-by-3 stock, the extension table shown above can be attached to the outfeed or infeed ends of a radial arm saw table. Using 2-by-4s, cut the legs, rails, and stretchers to suit the dimensions of your saw, making the length of the legs equal to the distance between the top of the saw table and the shop floor, less the thickness of the stretchers. Attach the rail stretchers so that their tops are flush with the rail's top edges. Attach the leg stretchers to the...

Building a knockdown sawhorse

With only a small amount of lumber and plywood and a few minutes' time, you can make a sturdy, knock-down sawhorse like the one shown above. Cut the legs from 3 4-inch plywood, then saw a 3-inch-deep notch in the middle of the top of both pieces. Next, cut the crosspiece from l-by-6 stock and saw a 1 -inch-deep slot 8 inches in from either end to fit into the legs. Angle the slots roughly 5 from the vertical so the legs spread slightly outward. For added stability, screw 4-inch-long l-by-2...

Jigs For Ironjawed Bench Vises

Fitting wooden inserts to metal jaws If your bench Is equipped with a metal-jawed vise like the one shown at the top of page 61, fitting interchangeable auxiliary jaws can extend the vise's versatility. The wooden inserts shown above will not only be less damaging to workpieces than metal jaws, but they can also be custom-made for special jobs. Each insert is made from -inch-thick solid stock with a rabbeted 1 -by-1 block glued at each end to hug the ends of the vise jaw. Although a pair is...

Fitting a drill press with an extension table

The small table typical of most drill presses will not adequately support many large workpieces. A customized extension table for the tool will enable you to keep a workpiece level as you feed it into an accessory like a sanding drum (above). Start by cutting a piece of 3A-inch plywood into a square with dimensions that suit your needs. Then mark a line down the middle of the piece and draw two circles centered on the line. Locate one about 4 inches from the back edge, sizing it to fit snugly...

Vacuum screening ramp

For cleaning dust off the shop floor, build a wedge-shaped screening ramp from 2-Inch plywood. Before assembling the pieces, cut an inlet port in the back to fit a dust collection hose and five rows of 2-inch-diameter holes through the top. When dust and chips are swept up onto the ramp, smaller particles will fall through the holes and continue on to the collector. Larger refuse will remain on the ramp for easy disposal.

Hooking a planer up to the system

Dust Chute Backflow Seal

A hood like the one shown at right can be custom-built to capture most of the dust generated by your planer. Make the hood from galvanized sheet metal, cutting the pieces with tin snips. Leave tabs where the pieces overlap so they can be pop riveted together. Make flanges on the sides to improve the seal and a hole in the back for the dust collection hose you will also need to create a lip along the top to connect to the ledge of the planer's chip discharge chute. Use an adapter to join the...

Tool Stands And Tables

Held upside down in a commercial table, a router becomes a stationary tool. Here, it is cutting a groove for a sliding dovetail joint. Many woodworkers consider the router table to be the single most important accessory you can add to your tool. A stand or table can transform a portable power tool into a reasonable facsimile of a full-size stationary machine. What they concede in power to their larger cousins, bench-mounted tools compensate with portability, ease of storage, and lower price....

Accident Prevention

Make sure workshop lighting and ventilation are adequate. Keep children, onlookers, and pets away from the work area. Concentrateon the job do not rush or take shortcuts. Never work when you are tired, stressed, or have been drinking alcohol or using medications that induce drowsiness. Find a comfortable stance avoid overreaching. Keep your work area clean and tidy clutter can lead to accidents. Use the appropriate tool for the job do not try to make a tool do something for which it was not...

Making a springloaded bench dog

A wooden bench dog can be made to fit snugly by equipping it with a metal spring cut from an old band saw or hacksaw blade. Cut your dog to size, then chisel out a small recess for the spring. The width and depth of the recess should equal the width and thickness of the spring, but its length should be slightly shorter than that of the spring. Press the spring into the recess the metal will bow outward, holding the dog firmly in its hole. bottom of the dog, except for the head. This provides a...

Providing Minor First

Hold your affected eye open with the forefinger and thumb of - one hand. Slowly rotate your eye, if necessary, to help expose i the particle. Gently wipe away the particle usingthe twisted end of a tissue moistened with water (above, left). Or, fill an eye irrigator with cool water and use it to flush out the particle Lean forward with both eyes closed and press the rim of the irrigator against the affected eye, and tilt back your head. Open your eyes (above, right) and blink several times to...

Shopstorage

Imake jewelry from exotic wood and dyed veneer. Some pieces have as many as 800 bits of wood in them, combining the colors and textures of various rare woods with brightly huedtWr-5 Being able to find some offbeat screw or fastener when I need it, or knowing here to retrieve that wonderful small chunk of rosewood that I've been saving for 10years isn't a luxury it's a necessity. Through the years, I have learned that the strength of a workshop depends on . l per organization and storage. I have...

Sawhorses

Sawhorses have countless uses in the woodworking shop, from table legs to tool stands. Occasionally it seems that their original purpose to support boards for sawing is only an afterthought. It is easy to see why sawhorses are considered so versatile, for their compact design makes them especially useful in shops with limited floor space. Some commercial models, like the ones in the photo at right, can be adjusted to different heights and folded up for easy storage. With commercial brackets...

Installing A Face Vise

Cut an 18-inch-long -by-3V2 inch hardwood support block and screw it in place under the front left corner of the bench, after boring a row of clearance holes for the bench dogs. Next, build up the face block by gluing two pieces of hardwood together cut it to a final size of 5-by-18 inches. To mark and bore the holes for the vise screw and guide rods, mark a line across the face of the face block offset the line from the top edge by the thickness of the benchtop slab (not the front apron...

Setting up a shopmade sanding station

To reduce the amount of dust generated by power sanding, build a portable stall that fits on a table or workbench. Cut the back, top, and sides from or -inch plywood. Taper the top edges of the sides to create a comfortable, open working space, like the one shown above. Cut an outlet in the back of the station for a dust collection hose or branch duct. Assemble the station with screws. Position the sanding station securely on your work surface attach the collector hose to the outlet. Turn on...

Designing A Shop For Efficient Dust Collection

Plastic Ductwork For Dust Collector

The diagram at right illustrates a typical home shop layout. The power tools and dust collection system have been arranged for maximum dust collection efficiency. With the exception of the table saw, all the machines are situated on the perimeter of the work area. The ducting for the central dust collection system runs close to the walls. Despite requiring a relatively long main line, this design allows for short branch lines and minimal directional changes both efficient arrangements. The...

Shopmade Edge Dogs

Edge dogs like those shown at right are ideal for securing a workpiece along the edge of your bench. They feature a round dowel at one end that drops into a bench dog hole and angled heads that butt up against the edge of the bench and hold the work. Start by cutting the dogs from hardwood stock. Both left-hand and right-hand dogs are needed, with the heads angled in opposing directions. Bore a Vi-inch-diameter hole through the ends, and drive a 3-inch length of dowel in each hole. Then insert...

Making and mounting a removable router table

Removable Router

Attached to a workbench or table, the extension table shown above serves as a compact router table that can be stored when it is not needed. Size the parts according to your needs. Start by cutting the top from -inch plywood, and the rails and braces from 2-by-4 stock. Saw the rails 6 inches longer than the width of the top so they extend under the top and can be fastened to the underside of the bench using nuts and hanger bolts. The hinged braces should be long enough to reach from the...

Making a wooden bench dog

Bench dogs can be crafted from hardwood stock the one shown at left uses an angled wooden tongue as a spring. Cut the dog to fit the holes in your workbench, then chisel out a dado from the middle of the dog. Saw a short kerf Into the lower corner of the dado, angling the cut so the tongue will extend beyond the edge of the dado. Cut the tongue from hardwood, making it about as long as the dado, as wide as the dog, and as thick as the kerf. Glue the tongue in the kerf.

Using commercial sawhorse brackets

A pair of metal sawhorse brackets can help you transform a couple of 2-by-4s and l-by-3s into a sturdy sawhorse, like the one shown at right. Saw the legs and crosspiece from 2-by-4s, then cut a bevel at the bottom of the legs so they will sit flat on the floor. Fit the legs into the bottom of the brackets, insert the crosspiece and spread the legs the brackets will grip the crosspiece and stabilize the horse. Screw the brackets to the legs and cross-piece. For added stability, add braces and a...

Setting up a temporary work surface

Above is inexpensive and easy to put together, yet it provides a large and stable work surface that can be set up and disassembled quickly. Start by fitting the sawhorses with crosspieces cut from 2-by-6 stock, then cut the 2-by-4s to the same length as the panel. In three of the boards, cut a notch about 8 inches from each end the notches should be about 2 inches deep and as wide as the thickness of the crosspieces. Cut matching notches in the top edges of the crosspieces. Center the unnotched...

Making a flipup stop

The flip-up bench stop shown at right provides another way to make quick guided crosscuts on a workbench. Cut the two pieces of the stop from hardwood. Screw the pieces to the end of the benchtop on the bench shown, the inner edge of the pivoting piece is lined up with the edge of the tool tray to provide a convenient reference line for squaring up a crosscut. Screw the stationary piece in place with two screws, and the flip-up piece with one so that it can pivot. When not in use, the pivoting...

Anatomy Of A Workbench

Build Heavy Workbench

The workbench shown at right is patterned after a traditional cabinetmaker's bench, and is crafted from solid maple. The bench incorporates two vises considered to be standard equipment a face vise on the front, left-hand end of the bench, and a tail vise with a sliding dog block mounted on the opposite end. You can build such a workbench from a kit supplied with materials and instructions. You can buy the plans for a bench and order the materials yourself. Or, you can follow the instructions...

Expanding a dust collectors capacity

You can more than double the capacity of your portable dust collector or shop vacuum by attaching a 55-gallon drum or a large plastic barrel as a mid-stage collector. Install plastic intake and exhaust ports on the drum as shown at left and mount a hose to the intake port on the drum to collect wood dust and chips. The 90 elbow on the intake port will create a cyclone effect inside the barrel, forcing chips and heavier sawdust against the walls of the barrel. Lighter dust will be drawn through...

Building a folding sawhorse

Made entirely from l-by-6 stock, with a hinged crossbrace and top, this lightweight sawhorse folds flat to store easily in even the most cramped workshop. Cut the legs and rails to length. Then, cut notches in the pieces for half-lap joints. Use T-type half-laps (inset, bottom) to join the legs to the bottom rails, and corner half-laps (inset, top) to join the top rails to the legs. Assemble and glue the two sections of the horse, and reinforce the joints with screws. When the glue has cured,...

Workbench

The workbench is the cornerstone of the woodshop, with a history almost as old as woodworking itself. Examples of primitive workbenches have been found dating back more than 2,000 years. Woodworkers in ancient Rome advanced the basic design, devising benches with simple stops that allowed them to secure pieces of wood. Until that time, craftsmen were forced to hold their work, cutting or shaping it with one hand while chopping or planing with the other. Further improvements came slowly,...

Lumber Rack

Bench Dog Placement

The storage rack at right features vertical supports screwed to wall studs. Cut from 2-by-4 stock, the supports buttress shopmade wood brackets, which hold up the lumber. You will need one support at each end of the rack, with an additional one every 32 inches along the wall. After bolting the supports to the studs, prepare the brackets by cutting the sides from 3A-inch plywood and the middle shelf piece from 2-by-4 stock lVz inches shorter than the brackets. Angle the top edge of the sides by...

Scale Drawings Of Stationary Tools

The illustrations above are overhead views of a dozen typical stationary tools drawn at a scale of Vi inch to 1 foot. To facilitate the task of arranging your tools on the shop floor, sketch your workshop space on a sheet of similarly scaled graph paper. Then photocopy this page, cut out the tools you need, and arrange the cutouts on the grid to determine the best layout for your shop. Consider the space and light requirements of the tools (pages 32-34) when assigning space to each one. Also...

Installing A Tail Vise

To install a tail vise on a bench with a sliding dog block, position the vise collar against the right-hand side end cap and outline the hole for the vise screw. Then set a support board on the drill press table and clamp the end cap on top of it. Fit the drill press with a spade bit slightly larger than the vise screw and bore a hole through the end cap (near right). Screw the vise collar to the end cap so the two holes line up. Next, secure the sliding dog block end-up in handscrews and clamp...

Air Compressors

Air-powered tools work best at a specific pressure indicated in the owner's manual for the particular tool. Before starting a job, the compressor's air regulator shoidd be adjusted to the proper setting for the task at hand. An air compressor can be fitted with a large number of tools and attachments, making it a convenient shop accessory. In some shops, a compressor can represent an alternative to some electric tools. For others, it can be a valuable supplement. Air-powered tools work best at...

Tool Placement And Work Flow

Designing a shop around the woodworking process For maximum efficiency, lay f> ut the tools in your shop so that the lumber follows a fairly direct route from rough stock to finished pieces. The diagram at left illustrates a logical work flow for a medium-size workshop. At the upper left-hand corner is the entrance where lumber is stored on racks. To the right is the stock preparation area, devoted to the table saw (or radial arm saw), jointer, and planer at this station, lumber is cut to...

Reinforcing Knockdown Joinery

Folding Legs Bracket Workbench

Instead of using mortise-and-tenon joints to build the base, use butt joints reinforced by truss rods, as shown at right. Available in kits, the rods can be loosened or tightened after assembly to compensate for wood movement as a result of changes in humidity. Rout grooves for the rods into the edges of the stretchers and the inside edges of the legs the depth and width of the channels should equal the rod's diameter. Test-assemble the base and mark the groove locations on the legs and arms....

Making and using a miter bench hook

Customize a standard bench hook to make 45 angle miter cuts by adding kerfs to one of the lips. Build a bench hook (page 66), then use a backsaw to cut two kerfs in the lip at opposing 45 angles and one at 90 (left). Use the miter bench hook as you would a standard bench hook, lining up the cutting line on the workpiece with the desired kerf.

Building a handsaw storage rack

Hand Saw Handle

The handsaw storage rack shown at left saves space by storing saws upright. The handles fit on pieces of wood the same shape as the hole in the handle. The blocks are mounted to a holder that slides in grooves cut in the top and bottom of the box. Cut the parts of the box to size, then equip your table saw with a Vi-inch dado blade. To accommodate the outside saw holders, cut Vi-inch-deep grooves 2lA inches from each end of the top and bottom. Saw another groove on each piece centered between...

Heating And Ventilation

Out Door Wall Air Intake Vents

Heating is a necessity for most shops in North America. Some woodworking tasks demand it gluing and finishing in particular require steady temperatures. Heating your shop also makes it more comfortable and safe numb fingers invite accidents. If your shop is some distance from your home's furnace, a separate heating system will be needed. Many woodworkers swear by wood heat it has the added benefit of consuming scrap pieces. Yet this means frequently feeding the stove and cleaning the chimney...

Home Workshop

TIME-LIFE BOOKS ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA THE ART OF WOODWORKING was produced by ST. REMY PRESS PUBLISHER Kenneth Winchester PRESIDENT Pierre L veill Series Editor Series Art Director Senior Editors Designers Research Editor Picture Editor Writers Administrator ProductionManager System Coordinator Photographer Pierre Home-Douglas Francine Lemieux Marc Cassini Text Heather Mills Research Normand Boudreault, Luc Germain, Solange Laberge Philippe Gauvreau, G rardMariscalchi, Time-Life Books is a...

Folddown Workbench And Tool Cabinet

Fold Down Workbench Plans

Ideal for small workshops, the storage cabinet shown below and opposite features a door that serves double-duty as a sturdy work surface that folds up out of the way when it is not needed. Mounted on a frame that is anchored to wall studs, the unit is built with an adjustable shelf and a perforated hardboard back for organizing and hanging tools as well as a work table supported by folding legs. The cabinet-bench can be made entirely of -inch plywood, except for the legs and leg rail, which are...

Shop Layout

Even in spacious shops, tools occasionally need to be moved around in small shops, reassigning floor space may be a part of every project. A wheeled base can make a 10-inch table saw, like the one pictured here, easy to reposition. As they gain experience and accumulate tools, most woodworkers pine for their own special place to practice their skills. In their fantasies, the workshop is an airy space equipped with a substantial workbench and an array of stationary machines and portable tools....

Shop Organization

Shop Organization

The illustration below shows one way of making efficient use of the space in a small shop in this case, one-half of a two-car garage. The three stationary machines chosen are essential for most projects the table saw, the jointer, and the band saw. The saw and jointer are mounted on casters so they can be moved if necessary. With the bench and table there is ample space for hand tool and portable power tool work. The storage space perforated hardboard and shelving is located along the walls a...

Bench Dogs And Hold Downs

Tail Vise Wood

Bench dogs are as important as vises in maximizing the flexibility and utility of a well-designed workbench. A set of bench dogs works like a second pair of hands to secure workpieces for planing, chiseling, mortising, carving, or other woodworking tasks. Although the bench dog looks like a deceptively simple peg, it incorporates design features that enable it to hold a workpiece firmly without slipping in its hole. One feature usually is a thin metal spring attached to one side that presses...