Flemish Garden Wall Bond

7250 Landscaping Designs

7250 Landscaping Designs

Get Instant Access

Flemish bond r

'Perp' joints

Queen Closer to align bond z.

Bed joints

Flemish garden wall bond o

Header

Stretcher

Garden wall bonds are easier to lay. In 'true' bonds headers must be exactly the right length If the wall Is to have a fair face both sides. In garden wall bonds, with their fewer headers, waste Is reduced.

English Bond comprises a row of stretchers followed by a row of headers.

English Bond comprises a row of stretchers followed by a row of headers.

Bed joints

Header

Flemish Garden Wall Bond

- Queen Closer

A quarter brick known as a Queen Closer is required to line up corners and openings.

- Queen Closer

A quarter brick known as a Queen Closer is required to line up corners and openings.

Brick Wall Corners With Rendered WallFlemish Garden Wall Bond WallRat Trap Bond Plan And Elevation
Top left - Flemish bond. Bottom left - English bond. English Garden Wall bond is often found on side and rear elevations.

English bond produces a stronger wall, although Flemish bond tended to be considered the more aesthetically pleasing. In the Victorian period a number of other bonds were developed including more economical, but less stable, garden wall versions of English and Flemish bond. Despite their name garden wall bonds were often used in houses, although they were usually confined to side or rear walls and were often rendered.

Header bricks tie solid walls together. Unfortunately in some speculative construction, headers were 'snapped'.

Snapped headers

Section through Flemish bond (correct construction)

Levelling timber to redress symmetry

Section through Flemish bond (correct construction)

Levelling timber to redress symmetry

Snapped Header

Snapped headers were often used where internal and external bricks were of different sizes. They were also used to save money. Facing bricks were much more expensive than commons. 'Snapping' a header created two facing bricks.

Flemish Bond Snapped Header
Note: these headers might be 'snapped'.

Timbers would sometimes be built into a wall in order to add stability. Although there is some debate as to their exact purpose, they may have been intended to provide lateral constraint and continuity while the lime mortar set. Another reason for burying timbers in the wall was to provide easier fixings for timber panelling and the ends of floor joists.

Snapped headers caused (and still cause) defects because there is a lack of tying-in between the inner and outer face. Bonding/levelling timbers are vulnerable to rot and beetle attack; if they lose their strength they will no longer resist the compressive loads in the wall and bulging and/or cracking may occur.

Other examples of Victorian bonding included cavities, for example, rat trap bond and Dearnes bond.

'Rat trap' bond was formed by laying bricks on edge. The void in the centre could fill with rainwater.

Void

Stretchers laid on edge

Void

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Homeowners Guide To Landscaping

Homeowners Guide To Landscaping

How would you like to save a ton of money and increase the value of your home by as much as thirty percent! If your homes landscape is designed properly it will be a source of enjoyment for your entire family, it will enhance your community and add to the resale value of your property. Landscape design involves much more than placing trees, shrubs and other plants on the property. It is an art which deals with conscious arrangement or organization of outdoor space for human satisfaction and enjoyment.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment