Building A Partition Wall

The framing techniques used to construct partition walls are simple because the walls are not toad-bearing However locating the joists beneath finished ceilings and floors may be difficult. If you don't have access to unfinished spaces above and below the work area, use a stud finder to determine the location and direction of the joists.

Interior partition walls usually are built with 2x4 lumber, but in some situations it is better to frame with 2x6 lumber (photo, left) Before finishing the walls (pages 132 to 139). have the building inspector review your work. The inspector may check to see that any required plumbing and wiring changes are complete.

Everything You Need:

Tools Drill and twist bit. chalk line, tape measure, combination square, pencil, fram-j Ing square, ladder, plumb bob. hammer

Materials; Framing lumber. 1Qd nails

Framing Wall

New wall perpendicular to joists:

Attach the top plate and sole plate directly to the ceiling and floor joists with I0d nails

New wall aligned with parallel joists: Attach top plate to ceiling joist and sole plate to the floor, using tOd nails

New wall perpendicular to joists:

Attach the top plate and sole plate directly to the ceiling and floor joists with I0d nails

New wall parallel to joists, but not aligned: Insta'l 2x4 blocking between the joists every 2 feet, using tOd nails The bottom of the blocking should be flush with the edges of joists. Anchor plates with 10d nails driven into the blocking

New wall aligned with parallel joists: Attach top plate to ceiling joist and sole plate to the floor, using tOd nails

How to Build a Partition Wall

IMark the location of the new wall on the ceiling, then snap two chalk lines to outline the position of the new top plate Locate the first ceiling |oist or cross block by drilling into the ceiling between the lines, then measure to find the remaining joists.

2 Make the top and sole plates by cutting two 2 x 4s to length Lay the plates side by side, and use a combination square to outline the stud locations at 16* intervals.

Wood Wall Plate Mark

3 Mark the position of the door framing members on the top plate and sote plate, using Xs for king studs and Os for jack studs. The rough opening measured between the msktes of jack studs should be about V wider than the actual width of the door to allow for adjustments during installation

4 Position the top plate against the ceiling between the chalk lines, and use two lOd na»ls to tack it In place with the stud marks facing down Use a framing square to make sure the plate is perpendicular to the adjoining walls, then anchor the plate to the joists with 10d nails _

(continued next page)

Option: on concrete floors attach the sole plate with a powdef-actuated naiief This tool available at rentar centos, fires a small gunpowder charge to drive masonry nails through the sole piate into corcrete Wear ear protection when using a powder-actuated nailer

5 Determine the position of the sole plate by hanging a plumb bob from edge ol the top plate near an adjoining wall so the plumb bob tip nearly touches the floor. When the plumb bob *s motionless, mark its position on the floor Repeat at the opposite end of top plate tnen snap a chalk I ne between the marks to show the location of the sole plate

6 Cut away the sole plate wfiere the ooor framing will fit. then po&ton the pieces ol the sole plate on the outline on the ftoor. On wood Itoors, anchor the sole plate pieces with 10d naits driven into the floor joists

Option: on concrete floors attach the sole plate with a powdef-actuated naiief This tool available at rentar centos, fires a small gunpowder charge to drive masonry nails through the sole piate into corcrete Wear ear protection when using a powder-actuated nailer

7 F»nd the length of the first stud by measuring the distance between the sole p*ate and tne top plato with a tape measure at the first stud mark. Add XT to ensure a snug fit, and cut the stud to length

Toenail Top Plate

Option: Attach the studs to the top plate and sole plate with metal connectors and 4d nails

8 Position the stud between the top psate and sole plate so the stud markings are covered

9 Attach the stud by toenailing through the s»des of the stud »nto the top plate and then the sole plate. Measure, cut. and install ail remaining studs, one at a time.

Option: Attach the studs to the top plate and sole plate with metal connectors and 4d nails

^ Q Frame the rougn opening for the ooor (see pages 116 to 119)

^ Q Frame the rougn opening for the ooor (see pages 116 to 119)

H Install 2x4 bloc* ng between studs. 4 feet I I from the floor Arrange to have the wiring and any other utility work completed, then have your project inspected. Install wallboard and trim the wail as shown on pages 132 to 139.

Framing an Opening for an Interior Door

Framing a door opening requires straight, dry lumber, so the door unit fits evenly into the rough opening and won't bind later on Buy the door or door kit and materials first. The type of door you select will depend on practical and aesthetic considerations. Prehung interior doors, are by far the most common. Most are 32' wide, but other sizes are available. Sliding. or bypass, doors and folding doors are popular for closets. Pocket doors, which slide into an enclosure in the wall, are practical in narrow hallways and other cramped spaces

There are minor differences in the technique for framing the opening for each type of door. Installing, or hanging, doors is covered on pages 148 and 149. This section contains instructions for framing a prehung door, bypass or folding doors, and a pocket door (pages 117 to 119) Install the door after installing wallboard.

Everything You Need:

Tools: Tape measure, framing square, hammer, hancfeaw

Materials 2x4 lumber, prehung door unit bypass or folding door kit and doors, or pocket door and kit, metal connectors. 8d common nails

How to Frame a Prehung Door Opening

IMark the rough opening on the top and sole plates as instructed on page 113. step 3. If you have already marked the rough opening, proceed to step 2

Door unit width

King stud marking

Jack stud marking

Extra K"

Extra VT Jj|ck slu<J marking

King stud marking

Tip: A prehung door greatly simplifies installation for standard-size openings Prehung doors are sold with temporary braces place that support tho door iambs during shipping. The braces are removed for installation (pages 148 and 149)

2 Measure and cut the king studs and position them at the markings (X). Toenail the joints by driving nails through the king stud and into the header at a 45c angle Or. attach the studs with metal connectors

Tip: A prehung door greatly simplifies installation for standard-size openings Prehung doors are sold with temporary braces place that support tho door iambs during shipping. The braces are removed for installation (pages 148 and 149)

How to Frame a Prehung Door Opening (cont*ved)

How to Frame a Prehung Door Opening (cont*ved)

Jack stud height

2 Mark the height o' the jack stud on each king stud The height of a jack stud fcx a standard door is 83*'. or taller than the door Endnail the header to the king stud above the mark for the jack stud

Jack Stud King Stud

4Positon the jack studs against the ins>des of the king studs. Endnail through the top of the header down into the jack studs

Toenailed joint
How Toenail Stud

3 install a cripple stud above the header, halfway between the king studs Toenail the cripple stud to the top plate, and endnail through the bottom of the header into the cripple stud

How Toenail Stud

5 If the sole plate is still m place, saw through it along the inside edges of the ¡ack studs. Remove the cut portion of the plate.

Option: Framing Openings for Sliding & Folding Doors

Finished Opening For Bifold DoorsBifold Doors For Fitting Opening

Most bifold doors are designed to fit in a 80*-high finished opening. Wood bifold doors have the advantage of allowing you to trim the docs, if necessary to fit openings that are slightly shorter

The same basic framing techniques are used, whether you re planning to install a sliding, bifold. pocket, or pre-hung interior door (page 148). The different door styles require different frame openings You may need to frame an opening 2 to 3 temes wider than the opening for standard pre-hung door Purchase the doors and hardware m advance, and consult the hardware manufacturer's instructions for tne exact dimensions of the rough opening for the type of door you select.

Most bifold doors are designed to fit in a 80*-high finished opening. Wood bifold doors have the advantage of allowing you to trim the docs, if necessary to fit openings that are slightly shorter

Standard bypass-door openings are 4. 5. 6. or 8 ft. The finished width should be 1" narrower than the combined width of the doors to provide a r overlap when the doors are closed For long closets that require three or more doors, subtract another V from the width of the finished opening for each door Check the hardware installation instructions for the requ-.red height of the opening

A pocket door's rough opening must be roughly twice the width of ihe .loor itself to allow the door to si de c ompletely into the enclosure in the finished wall The enclosure is formed by nailing a pocket door cage (available at home centers) to the Iraming. then addmg wallboard and trim. Consult the cage manufacturer's instructions for the dimensions of the rough opening. Note: Replacing a standard door with a pocket door is a major job that's not for the faint of heart. It requires tearing off the existing trim and surface material and reframmg the opening. The job can be greatly complicated if the wall is load-bearing or if plumbing or wiring run through the existing wall

Wood Working 101

Wood Working 101

Have you ever wanted to begin woodworking at home? Woodworking can be a fun, yet dangerous experience if not performed properly. In The Art of Woodworking Beginners Guide, we will show you how to choose everything from saws to hand tools and how to use them properly to avoid ending up in the ER.

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Responses

  • luukas liukko
    How to install studs 2x4?
    2 years ago

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